RESOURCES.

A selection of helpful resources below...

The following research is provided in support of the noted benefits of fulvic. If the summaries here ignite your curiosity feel free to click on the links provided to access the full script or, where the paper is not freely available, the option to purchase a copy.

The influence of fulvic and ulmic acids from peat, on the spontaneous contractile activity of smooth muscles

Smooth muscle (SM) tissue contractions are involuntary movements triggered by impulses that travel through the autonomic nervous system. For example, artery walls include smooth muscle that relaxes and contracts to move blood through the body. Former studies have identified a ‘chemical effect’ of peat containing substances, which includes a stimulatory response of the spontaneous contractile activity (SCA) of SM tissue. This study sought to investigate which classes of compounds of peat ingredients could be responsible for this effect. Fulvic and ulmic acids were evaluated, and found to exert similar effects on the receptors as the peat extract. Thus, it was concluded that the agonistic effect on SM resulted from these active components, and thus may support healthy blood circulation. 

-       Beer, A-M, Lukanov, J and Sagorchev, P, 2000, The influence of fulvic and ulmic acids from peat, on the spontaneous contractile activity of smooth muscles, Phytomedicine, 7, 5, 407-415

READ MORE

Effect of fulvic acid on the ultraviolet induced skin aging: The effect of fulvic acid on fibroblasts and matrix metalloproteinase

Important reasons for skin aging are a decreased number of fibroblasts and decreased synthesis of extracellular proteins in the dermis, as well as increased degradation of the collagenous matrix from UV radiation and other environmental stresses. This study investigated the effect of fulvic acid on fibroblasts and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are responsible for the degradation of collagen. There was a statistically significant inhibition of collagen degradation in the presence of fulvic acid at differing concentrations, highlighting fulvic acid’s anti-aging effect. 

-       Kinoshita, H, Kinoshita, M, Takahashi, A, Yuasa, S and Fukuda, K, 2012, Effect of fulvic acid on the ultraviolet induced skin aging: The effect of fulvic acid on fibroblasts and matrix metalloproteinase, Nishinihon Journal of Dermatology, 74, 4, 427-431


READ MORE

Reactive oxygen species scavenging ability of a new compound derived from weathered coal

The scavenging activity of three fulvic acids towards the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide radical (O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH) was studied. All fulvic acids displayed scavenging activity towards the ROS while some also demonstrated pro-oxidant activity; reducing metal ions which can cause free radical generation. Fulvic acid was concluded to have both free radical reducing and metal-chelating activity.

-       Ueda, J, Ikota, N, Shinozuka, T and Yamaguchi, T, 2004, Reactive oxygen species scavenging ability of a new compound derived from weathered coal, Spectrochimica Acta Part A, 60, 2487-2492

READ MORE

Antilipid peroxidative property of Shilajit

This study investigated the effect of Shilajit on lipid peroxidation (the oxidative degradation of lipids which results in cell damage) and antioxidant glutathione content in rat liver homogenate. Shilajit inhibited lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent manner, and significantly reduced the rate of decline of glutathione, highlighting the antioxidant potential of Shilajit. 

-       Tripathi, YB, Shukla, S, Chaurasia, S and Chaturvedi, 1996, Antilipid peroxidative property of Shilajit, 10, 269-270

READ MORE